trafalgar square steckbrief

A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square, but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999. [22], After 1732, the King's Mews were divided into the Great Mews and the smaller Green Mews to the north by the Crown Stables, a large block, built to the designs of William Kent. The scheme was initiated by the Royal Society of Arts and continued by the Fourth Plinth Commission, appointed by the Mayor of London. They also employed a hawk to keep them away. [53], Two statues erected in the 19th century have since been removed. [29] In 1841 it was decided that two fountains should be included in the layout. It is in the red set alongside the Strand and Fleet Street. In July 2003 a huge project to transform Trafalgar Square was completed. [62] The desirability of the birds' presence was contentious: their droppings disfigured the stonework and the flock, estimated at its peak to be 35,000, was considered a health hazard. [44] There are two other statues on plinths, both installed during the 19th century: General Sir Charles James Napier by George Cannon Adams in the south-west corner in 1855, and Major-General Sir Henry Havelock by William Behnes in the south-east in 1861. [107] In 2012, the Greater London Authority created a bylaw for regulating busking and associated tourism. [89] The square was used by the England national rugby union team on 9 December 2003 to celebrate their victory in the 2003 Rugby World Cup,[90] and on 13 September 2005 for the England national cricket team's victory in the Ashes series. [71] It is usually held twelve days before Christmas Day. Trafalgar Square takes its name from Admiral Nelson's famous (Sieg) victory in the (Schlacht bei Trafalgar) Battle of Trafalgar on 21 October 1805. All the stonework was of Aberdeen granite. [9], London Underground's Charing Cross station on the Northern and Bakerloo lines has an exit in the square. Ce local, qui existe toujours, sert aujourd'hui de remise aux employés de la voirie. From the 14th to the late 17th century, much of the area occupied by Trafalgar Square … Water was pumped to the fountains by a steam engine housed in a building behind the gallery. In 1838 a Nelson Memorial Committee had approached the government proposing that a monument to the victory of Trafalgar, funded by public subscription, should be erected in the square. The construction includes two lifts for disabled access, public toilets and a café. La dernière modification de cette page a été faite le 21 novembre 2020 à 19:57. Le lieu est bien connu pour être un espace social et de liberté d'expression1. [70] In 1990, a man sawed into the tree with a chainsaw a few hours before a New Year's Eve party was scheduled to take place. [57] The fountains were fed from two wells, one in front of the National Gallery and one behind it connected by a tunnel. It is a large pedestrian square, bounded on three sides by roads. [24][29] For Barry, as for Wilkins, a major consideration was increasing the visual impact of the National Gallery, which had been widely criticised for its lack of grandeur. [13] At the top of the column is a statue of Horatio Nelson, who commanded the British Navy at the Battle of Trafalgar. Although Britain won, war hero Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson was killed during the battle on his ship, HMS Victory. [114], Public space and tourist attraction in central London, Hitler had specifically requested that all of, List of public art in Trafalgar Square and the vicinity, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2, "A Cultural Introduction to the Languages of Europe", "The convenient fiction of who owns priceless treasure", "Trafalgar Square (Hansard, 27 November 2003)", "TRAVEL ADVISORY; Boon to Pedestrians In Central London", "Take a behind-the-scenes tour of the disused parts of Charing Cross tube station", "Trafalgar Square and the National Gallery", "Suggestions for Trafalgar Square's Vacant Plinth", "Mayor attacks generals in battle of Trafalgar Square", "Trafalgar Square fountain spurts to new heights", "The pigeons have gone, but visitors are flocking to Trafalgar Square", "Trafalgar Square tree lighting ceremony", "Trafalgar Square sparkles blue as Christmas tree lights go on", "Man Takes Chain Saw to Trafalgar Square Tree, but Tannenbaum Stands", "On This Day – 17 March – 1968: Anti-Vietnam demo turns violent", "The Committee of 100: Sparking a new left", "COP OUT CAMP OUT Âť Camp for Climate Action", "UK Indymedia – Climate protestors scale Canadian Embassy and deface flag", "UK Indymedia – Climate Camp Trafalgar- Ice Bear action", "UK Indymedia – Thur Dec 17 protest outside Danish Embassy, London", Wikinews:Battle for Trafalgar Square, London as violence breaks out between demonstrators and riot police, "Sea Cadets in Battle of Trafalgar parade", "Armistice Day: Nation remembers war dead", "Trafalgar Square fountains: Two arrested over red dye protest", "Vegan activists turn Trafalgar Square fountains blood red", "London 2012 Olympics: Trafalgar Square countdown clock stops", "London gets ready to welcome back the Tour de France on Monday", "Harry Potter premiere: Stars and fans bid tearful goodbye", "Lego's Next Architecture Set Will Be London's Trafalgar Square", "Buskers in the West End could need licences after outcry at noise", "National Gallery plans to demand Trafalgar Square buskers leave so it can create 'one of London's great parks, Official website of Trafalgar Square on the Mayor of London's website, Trafalgar Square webcam from Camvista.com, Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Trafalgar_Square&oldid=987517587, Cultural infrastructure completed in 1845, Tourist attractions in the City of Westminster, Grade I listed parks and gardens in London, Wikipedia articles with MusicBrainz place identifiers, Wikipedia articles with WORLDCATID identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 7 November 2020, at 15:39. Trafalgar Square (Place de Trafalgar) est l'une des places les plus importantes et animées du centre de Londres. [43] The latter was a gift from the Commonwealth of Virginia, installed in 1921. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash, but progress was slow after his death, and the square did not open until 1844. The name "Royal Mews" comes from the practice of keeping hawks here for moulting; "mew" is an old word for this. In 1987, protesters chained themselves to the tree. He took so long to complete sketches that its corpse began to decompose and some parts had to be improvised. Since 2003, a firework display centred on the London Eye and South Bank of the Thames has been provided as an alternative. Trafalgar Square was designed by Sir Charles Barry as a ceremonial and cultural space. [46], There are three busts of admirals against the north wall of the square. [36] Each lion weighs seven tons. The event includes music and poetry readings, culminating in a bugler playing the Last Post and a two-minute silence at 11 am. La colonne est entourée de quatre sculptures de lions protégeant la statue de l'officier, ajoutées en 1867. [59], The square was once famous for feral pigeons and feeding them was a popular activity. Nelson's (Säule) Column is 56 m high and on top you can see the statue of Admiral Nelson, who died in the battle.. Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square… The protesters rallied for peace and against war and nuclear weapons. The square was to be named for William IV commemorating his ascent to the throne in 1830. The Square's name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, the British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars over France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar. Elle prend ce nom en 1830[2]. It was removed in 1943 and re-sited on the Victoria Embankment ten years later. [74], The square has become a social and political focus for visitors and Londoners, developing over its history from "an esplanade peopled with figures of national heroes, into the country's foremost place politique", as historian Rodney Mace has written. [59][60], A programme of restoration was completed by May 2009. The statues have paws that resemble cats more than lions. [79] It was billed as a UK base for direct action on climate change and saw various actions and protests stem from the occupation. It was renamed in 1999 to commemorate national heroes of Barbados. [33], Nelson's Column was planned independently of Barry's work. [2] From the reign of Richard II to that of Henry VII, the mews was at the western end of the Strand.

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